TEXT REFERENCES and ARTICLES for EDUC 6615 Effective Teaching Using Learning Styles

Texts:

Silver, H. F., Strong, R. W., & Perini, M. J. (2000). So each may learn: Integrating learning styles and multiple intelligences. Alexandria, VA: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development.

Glatthorn, A. A. (1996). The teacher's portfolio: Fostering and documenting professional development. Rockport, MA: Pro-Active Publications. (Note: This book was sent to you with the materials for a previous course.)

Inventories:

Silver, H. F., Strong, R. W., & Perini, M. J. (2001). Learning style/multiple intelligences checklist. Woodbridge, NJ: The Thoughtful Education Press.

Silver, H. F., Hanson, J. R., & Strong, R. W. (Revised 1988). Teaching style inventory. Woodbridge, NJ: The Thoughtful Education Press

Required Readings Packet:

The following additional readings can be found in the Required Readings Packet:

Gardner, H. (1995). Reflections on multiple intelligences: Myths and messages. Phi Delta Kappan, 77(3), 200–209.

Greenhawk, J. (1997). Multiple intelligences meet standards. Educational Leadership, 55(1), 62–64.

Guild, P. B., & Chock-Eng, S. (1998). Multiple intelligence, learning styles, brain-based education: Where do the messages overlap? Schools in the Middle, 7(4), 38–40.

McCarthy, B. (1997). A tale of four learners: 4MAT's learning styles. Educational Leadership, 54(6), 46–51.

Reiff, J. C. (1996). Bridging home and school through multiple intelligences. Childhood Education, 72(3), 164–166.

Section 7 Online Required Reading
[NOTE: insert the date YOU accessed the online article in place of the date in this reference following the word Retrieved]

Carlson-Pickering, J. (1999). MI & technology: A winning combination! Retrieved January 31, 2004, from
 
http://www.ri.net/RITTI_Fellows/Carlson-Pickering/MI_Tech.htm

 

 

VIDEO REFERENCES EDUC 6615 Effective Teaching Using Learning Styles – video programs in other courses are formatted in the same manner

 

The video programs for this course are written in single spaced hanging indent format in the reference list as follows [please NOTE placement of capital letters, punctuation and italics]:

Canter & Associates (Executive Producer). (2001). Program one, Introduction to learning styles, part one. Learning differences: Effective teaching with learning styles and multiple intelligences [videotape]. Los Angeles: Canter & Associates.

Canter & Associates (Executive Producer). (2001). Program two, Introduction to learning styles, part two. Learning differences: Effective teaching with learning styles and multiple intelligences [videotape]. Los Angeles: Canter & Associates.

Canter & Associates (Executive Producer). (2001). Program three, Student profiles. Learning differences: Effective teaching with learning styles and multiple intelligences [videotape]. Los Angeles: Canter & Associates.

Canter & Associates (Executive Producer). (2001). Program four, Teacher profiles. Learning differences: Effective teaching with learning styles and multiple intelligences [videotape]. Los Angeles: Canter & Associates.

Canter & Associates (Executive Producer). (2001). Program five, Multiple intelligences theory, part one. Learning differences: Effective teaching with learning styles and multiple intelligences [videotape]. Los Angeles: Canter & Associates.

Canter & Associates (Executive Producer). (2001). Program six, Multiple intelligences theory, part two. Learning differences: Effective teaching with learning styles and multiple intelligences [videotape]. Los Angeles: Canter & Associates.

Canter & Associates (Executive Producer). (2001). Program seven, Multiple intelligences theory in practice. Learning differences: Effective teaching with learning styles and multiple intelligences [videotape]. Los Angeles: Canter & Associates.

Canter & Associates (Executive Producer). (2001). Program eight, The hook and hold strategy, anticipatory set. Learning differences: Effective teaching with learning styles and multiple intelligences [videotape]. Los Angeles: Canter & Associates.

Canter & Associates (Executive Producer). (2001). Program nine, The hook and hold strategy, questions. Learning differences: Effective teaching with learning styles and multiple intelligences [videotape]. Los Angeles: Canter & Associates.

Canter & Associates (Executive Producer). (2001). Program ten, The hook and hold strategy, tasks. Learning differences: Effective teaching with learning styles and multiple intelligences [videotape]. Los Angeles: Canter & Associates.

Canter & Associates (Executive Producer). (2001). Program eleven, The hook and hold strategy, settings and feedback. Learning differences: Effective teaching with learning styles and multiple intelligences [videotape]. Los Angeles: Canter & Associates.

Canter & Associates (Executive Producer). (2001). Program twelve, The hook and hold strategy, assessments. Learning differences: Effective teaching with learning styles and multiple intelligences [videotape]. Los Angeles: Canter & Associates.

Please note placement of capital letters, punctuation, and italics.

 

IN-TEXT PARENTHETICAL CITATIONS [These are examples from EDUC 6625 Habits of Mind – video programs in other courses are formatted in the same manner]

 

Anytime you use the words “video program” or use the name of a speaker in a video program, you MUST use proper citations as in the examples above.

 

Avoid using direct quotes from a videotape. Direct quotes can be used from print sources and must be in quotations marks. When a videotape is used as a source, the in-text citation is (author, date) at the end of the sentence. When referring to a person in a videotape, the date (2002) of the video is placed directly after the person’s name in the text and at the end of the sentence, cite the video (Canter, Program Two). Examples follow:

 

Dr. Leu (2003) recommends that teachers participate in an established Internet Project before striking out on their own (Canter, Program Three)

 

Do not write statements similar to the following:

  • In the video program for this week
  • This week’s video program

 

Instead, this would be proper (or something similar):

 

In the video program Internet Workshop (2003), Dr. Donald Leu introduces four instructional models for using the Internet in the classroom (Canter, Program Two).

 

The only time the program and number are used in the parenthetical citation are if the citation is split into two parts as in the examples above. This only happens when referring to a speaker or author from the video. In a sentence in which a person’s name is not used, only author and date are included in the parenthetical citation, no program number. For example:

 

Teachers often find it difficult to find the time and resources to address all of the learning spaces (Canter, 2003).

Internet Workshop instructional model is useful in supporting curriculum (Canter, 2003).

 

HOW TO CITE MORE THAN ONE PROGRAM IN THE SAME VIDEO

 

In some papers, two programs from the same video may be used as references. Unless there is a way to differentiate between the program references, both in-text parenthetical citations would be identical: (Canter, 2003). In order to differentiate between Program Five and Program One in the following example, references must be listed in alphabetical order. In this example, Program Five is listed before Program One. Next, when writing the in-text parenthetical citation, use lower case letters (alphabetical order) after the date. DO NOT put the lower case letters (a or b, etc.) anywhere in the Reference List. In this example, (Canter, 2003a) refers to Program Five and (Canter, 2003b) refers to Program One. Please see the following example:

 

Internet Inquiry can be a powerful learning experience for students (Canter, 2003b). Looking at different learning spaces can help you offer students appropriate learning opportunities within each environment (Canter, 2003a).

 

REFERENCES

 

Canter & Associates (Executive Producer). (2003). Program five: Internet inquiry. Integrating technology in the curriculum, part one.  Los Angeles: Canter & Associates.

 

Canter & Associates (Executive Producer). (2003). Program one: Learning spaces and the web. Integrating technology in the curriculum, part one. Los Angeles: Canter & Associates.

 

 

PUNCTUATION

 

Please note also that in-text parenthetical citations belong outside quotation marks but inside the punctuation for the sentence. Here are some examples from the OWL webpage linked on the Writing Page website.

 

Jones (1998) found "students often had difficulty using APA style" (p. 199); what implications does this have for teachers?
 
According to Jones (1998), "Students often had dificulty using APA style, especially when it was their first time" (p. 199).
 
She stated, "Students often had difficulty using APA style," (Jones, 1998, p. 199), but she did not offer an explanation as to why. 

 

EMAILS are Personal Communication and are not included on the Reference List. These are parenthetical citations only as follows:

 

Bryan Burgin (personal communication, November 18, 1998) notified me that my proposal had been accepted.

 

DISCUSSION FORUM POSTS Discussion forum posts are not considered Personal Communication.

 

Discussion post in-text parenthetical citations are (author, date) just as for most other citations. Note: author’s last name only followed by comma and date. For the reference list, format as follows. This information is in the APA Guidelines for Electronic References that can be found on the MSITC Information webpage. The direct webpage for discussion post references is http://www.bedfordstmartins.com/online/cite6.html#3

To document a posting to a Web discussion forum, provide the following information [format in hanging indent style, single spaced]:

  • Author's name Classmate who wrote the post
  • Date of posting, in parentheses Date classmate posted the message
  • Title of posting Title in the classmate's subject line
  • Posting statement Message posted to
  • URL Use the URL for the discussion forum. To get this, right click on the Discussion Forum title to open in a new window. Use this URL for your reference.
    NOTE: In your reference, the URL will not work unless the reader is logged into the Blackboard course site. So don't worry if the URL doesn't work -- I'll be able to access it :)

EXAMPLE:

Bowman, L. (2003, December 18). Reply to Andy. Message posted to http://discussionforumURL

Marcy, B. (1999, April 3). Think they'll find any evidence of Mallory & Irvine? Message posted to http://everest.mountainzone.com/99/forum

 

WRITING PAGE WEBSITE:

 

http://elearning.homestead.com/writing.html

 

MSITC INFORMATION WEBPAGE:

 

http://elearning.homestead.com/MSITC.html

 

RUBRICS:

 

http://courserubrics.homestead.com/6615_1.html